Account Entries

The following entries in Feoffee accounts for 1766 to 1866 mention Charles Warwick.

Date Name Type Description Amount (£ s d)   Building link
22/2/1766 Charles Warrick income Paid Mr Moalson for bricks and lime for Charles Warricks house 0 - 14 - 04  
none
4/12/1769 Charles Warwick support 0 - 10 - 06  
none
29/11/1786 Charles Warrick income To Charles Warrick for Carriage 12 Bushels Lime from the Kiln 3 - 00 - 00  
none
26/12/1788 Charles Warwick support CE 0 - 05 - 00  
none
21/12/1789 Charles Warrick support CE 0 - 04 - 06  
none
21/12/1790 Charles Warrick support CE 0 - 05 - 00  
none
21/12/1791 Charlse Warrick support CE 0 - 05 - 00  
none
21/12/1792 Charlse Warrick support CE 0 - 04 - 00  
none
21/12/1793 Charlse Warrick support CE 0 - 03 - 00  
none
22/12/1794 Charlse Warrick support CE 0 - 05 - 06  
none
0/0/1796 Charlse Warrick support CE 0 - 05 - 06  
none
0/0/1797 Charles Warwick support CE 0 - 05 - 00  
none
0/0/1799 Charles Warwick support CE 0 - 04 - 06  
none
0/0/1799 Charles Warwick support 0 - 05 - 00  
none
0/0/1800 Charles Warwick support CE 0 - 04 - 00  
none
0/0/1801 Charles Warwick support PE 0 - 03 - 00  
none
0/0/1802 Charles Warwick support CE 0 - 02 - 06  
none
0/0/1803 Charles Warwick support CE 0 - 03 - 00  
none
Notes:  
  The Feoffee was a charity which owned several properties and provide aid to the poor from the income derived from these properties. Two Feoffee ledgers survive for the period 1766 to 1866. They record only payments. During this period, it appears that the Feoffee owned Stafford House which was being run as a work house. There are no expenditures recorded for the support of people in the workhouse. It seems likely that this fell on the trustees for the poor rate. The payment are of two types: - support payments to beneficiaries, occasionally with a brief explanation of why the support was needed - payments for services or taxes, usually connected with the maintenance of feoffee properties, sometimes with an indication of the work Most of the support payments are made in the winter months, presumably because there was insufficient agricultural work to provide employment for everyone in these months.